Emily Wilde’s Map of the Otherlands: Review

Emily Wilde's Map of the Otherlands

When mysterious faeries from other realms appear at her university, curmudgeonly professor Emily Wilde must uncover their secrets before it’s too late in this heartwarming, enchanting second installment of the Emily Wilde series.

Bambleby and Emily are on another adventure, this time to the picturesque Austrian Alps, where Emily believes they may find the door to Bambley’s realm, and the key to freeing him from his family’s dark plans. Emily must unravel the mysterious workings of faerie doors, and of her own heart.

Emily Wilde's Map of the Otherlands Review

I loved this book! I really enjoyed the first, but the second was great!! This series is so unique and quirky, academic and fun.

Emily Wilde is definitely more (fantasy) historical fiction, with the romance being a small part. The journal-like entries with field notes were such a novel format. Emily was a great MC, and she’s kind of a stereotypical academic character that throws herself into her work, but may not be the best at human interaction. She’s a faerie expert which I love. Wendell reminds me a lot of Howl from Howl’s moving castle. He’s a bit cranky and silly, and his character really compliments Emily! They have the best banter and a very mature/understanding relationship. Their romance is very fun and swoony at times (no spice though).

This sequel was a bit of a cozy mystery with new characters, faeries, and a more personal quest. I’d definitely recommend this series if you love faeries, fun characters, and academic FMCs.

I’ve never wanted faeries to be more real while reading this book! Maybe I would use my biology degree πŸ˜‚ This is the kind of STEM I want to read πŸ‘

Β 

Rating

5/5

SPICE LEVEL

Quotes

β€œThe problem is not the packing, I admit; I simply dislike traveling.Β  Why people wish to wander to and fro when they could simple remain at home is something I will never understand. Everything is the way I like it here.”

β€œI don’t like to hold his gaze for too long; not because I find it intimidating, but because a part of me worries that if I do, I will never wish to look away.”

β€œHow I missed you. ‘It was only a day!’ I can hear you reply. Well, a day is far too long.”

Leave a Reply